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Beauty

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Going under the knife

We want to look good, to have a personal style that’s attractive and attentive. It’s why we buy the right clothes and shoes. It’s why we exercise and diet. It’s why women put on makeup and perfume, and men wear aftershave and colognes. (Albeit, these are more odor enhancers than anything, but we cannot deny the part they play into our desire to look good.)

The pursuit of beauty is a compelling issue for women. Unlike men, there is a stigma with women and beauty. For generations, they have been under societal pressure to have beautiful faces, beautiful bodies and the accessories to accent the fact. Women are expected to paint and pierce, to squeeze and shape, to make beauty a part of their lifestyle.

Unfortunately, these expectations put a lot of pressure on women. Many feel they fall short of what beauty should be, especially as they age and time takes its toll on their faces and bodies. In that light, the cosmetic surgery industry has become a major solution for turning back the clock. Face lifts, Botox, breast enlargements, tummy tucks, buttock augmentation, all once the privilege of the rich are now available to everyone of any budget. And the advancements in the technology has made it easier than ever to get treatments and to get back on your feet in no time.

The Attraction of Beauty Enhancement

The idea of getting procedures done quickly is convincing more and more women to go under the knife. Where a treatment once took hours to complete and weeks for recovery, patients hid away in hospitals or at home. They would blanket themselves in stories of exhaustion or a faked illness because surgeries to enhance beauty were not “good.” The need to be naturally beautiful convinced women the world had to believe their youthful appearances were the result of graceful aging. Women wanted to create the impression they are beautiful because they are supposed to be, not because they augmented the process.

It is believed over 98 percent of patients will not even tell their husbands they have had any sort of augmentation that isn’t obvious, such as Botox. Most men would actually object to procedures, arguing they love their significant others just as they are. To that end, even those dearest to patients has to believe their beauty is untouched.

The Mentality Behind the Pursuit of Beauty

Women who engage in beauty enhancements are not necessarily ashamed or embarrassed by their looks. They are not trying to impress anyone – necessarily. One could ultimately argue the pursuit of beauty is to have a look that does impress the outside world, but augmentation tends to be about impressing one’s self, to look in the mirror and appreciate what you see. People want to look good because that makes them feel good. Confidence and self-esteem are critical to self-worth. Our society embraces a certain type of beauty and women pursue it.

Going Under the Knife

Cosmetic surgery has become affordable and convenient. Botox treatments can be performed in under 30 minutes with patients back on the street 15 minutes later. Breast and buttock augmentation has also become streamlined procedures. Of course, these procedures – and others like rhinoplasty – are not as easy to hide as some cosmetic procedures, but the positive public reaction can far outweigh the obviousness of cosmetic surgery.

The emotional benefits of procedures are immediate. Discomfort with your appearance will be greatly alleviated. Wrinkles that make you feel older, a nose too large for your face or unhappiness about the sagging portions of your body after finally losing weight, they can all have a negative impact on how you feel about yourself. Adjusting these imperfections will do wonders for your self-esteem.

There are some members of the medical community that do not believe cosmetic surgery is the answer. We only agree that it is not the answer for everyone. A person that suffers from severe depression is not necessarily going to feel better about themselves after cosmetic surgery. Hopefully, someone considering these procedures will connect with a responsible surgeon that will help them make the right decisions. But, for a lot of women, going under the knife will enrich their lives.

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